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Thursday, October 27, 2005

2 Gallons 3 Quarts and 1/4 cup...

That's how much honey I harvested yesterday. I din't take to many photos because I was worried about getting the camera sticky. Anyways, the temps were in the 70s so my inteded meathod of fumigating bees out of the super wouldn't work. I had to go to plan B: maunual brushing of bees off of frames. It took about an hour and at the end there were about 1,000 very confused, very angery bees in the garage. Not exacly the best place but, they all cleared out and I didn't get a single sting! Anyways, with all the bees off the comb I could see how great it looked. The cappings were so white I'm thinking of using this colony for comb honey production next year. Anyways, here's a picture of the comb I'm talking about...

The extractor was, of cource, the centerpeice for the honey extraction. Unfortunately, I'm a little inexperienced at balancing frames so, half of the time the extractor was jumping around like a salad spinner filled with a brick. The honey came out ok, but, the straining is what really took the time. I clocked it at about 3 tablespoons per minute. That gave me plenty of time to put the super back on the colony. Strait out of the hive the honey had a mild bitterness to it but, after about three hours the flavor completely changed. Now it tastes like sugar but, has aromas and flavors that couldn't be found with table sugar. Here's a little interesting tid-bit, if I sold all the honey from that one super I'd have made a little over $100.00! To bad that became illegal. Anyways, here's a picture of the honey...

3 Comments:

Blogger Cardboard Knight said...

damn illegalnessedes

2:49 PM, October 27, 2005  
Blogger The Beekeeper said...

Yeah. IT really doesn't make to much sence. Honey, when cured by the bees, is anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-viral and just basicly anti-pathogenic. The cool part about my honey though, is that I accidentaly spilled some pollen into it in such a small amount that you can't really taste or smell it but, the small doses of pollen supposedly help to reduce allergies. Hooray for a lack of sneezing and watery eyes!

3:40 PM, October 27, 2005  
Blogger j00|{z said...

Hooray!

7:09 PM, October 29, 2005  

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